Concert Safety and Personal Injury Risks

Metro Atlanta is well known for several concert venues and is a location
frequently on many artists’ concert lineups. Especially as the weather
gets warmer, more and more people will travel to Cobb County and surrounding
area venues for events and entertainment.

While these events can be tremendous fun, they also have the potential
for significant personal injury. Perhaps the most well known instance
of this happened at a 1979 rock concert for The Who. A crowd rushed the
stage, causing 11 deaths and 27 additional injuries. At a Pearl Jam concert
in 2000, nine people died and 26 more were injured when a stage collapsed
following a group of fans rushing the stage.

The attorneys and Jones & Swanson have represented victims injured
at concert venues as a result of the negligence of other parties. The
sheer number of attendees, as well as environmental circumstances such
as alcohol, can lead to unsafe circumstances. Crowds can easily lead to
falls and other incidents that leave victims with injuries.

Typical venues incorporate safety standards as a precaution to attempt
to prevent injuries to visitors. Unfortunately, these can sometimes be
lacking. Examples might include defective guardrails or an excess number
of attendees in violation of fire codes.

Regardless of the cause of an injury at an entertainment venue, a personal
injury lawsuit is possible. It will be necessary to prove the negligence
of either a person or the venue owners. For more information following
a concert injury sustained by yourself or a loved one, call Jones &
Swanson today at 770-427-5498. We’ll provide honest and up-front
feedback on the possibility of recovering damages for your injuries based
on the facts of your situation. All consultations are free of charge and
we work on a contingency basis, meaning no fee is collected unless we
win compensation for you.

Concert Safety and Personal Injury Risks syndicated from http://lawpallp.tumblr.com

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